[Skip to content]

BILD - All About People
Wednesday 24 August 2016
View Basket View Basket
Search
.

Useful resources

Speak Up

SpeakUp have 2 resources which can help people with learning disabilities and/or autism understand what abuse is, what to do if you are a victim of abuse and how to get support. The booklet called ‘Abuse’ is an EasyRead guide to abuse which is colourful and has lots of pictures to help people understand what abuse is and what to do if someone is abused.  

Find out more on their website.    

'It can still happen here: systemic risk factors that may contribute to the continued abuse of people with intellectual disabilities'; a highly commended paper in the Tizard Learning Disability Review

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the response to the scandal of abuse in services for people with intellectual disabilities in the light of research evidence and analysis.

The research was carried out through critical reflection and a review of literature, in particular, recent research into possible indicators that a service is at risk of becoming abusive is used to test the hypotheses and implied solutions that are currently being adopted.

The findings found some of the responses to recent scandals are necessary but not sufficient to prevent future harm. Furthermore, some of the proposed solutions may actually increase the likelihood of further abuse. Prevention of abuse requires a broader and more evidence-based response.  More >

Find out more information.

People 'kept in asylums despite community care pledge'

Thousands of people with learning disabilities are still languishing in institutions, despite Government promises to provide care for them in the community in the wake of the Winterbourne View scandal, a report by Stephen Bubb, the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO) called 'Time For Change – The Challenge Ahead', has warned.  More >

Download the ACEVO report >

Download the Easy Read version of the ACEVO report > 

Respond website image
Respond

Respond works with children and adults with learning disabilities who have experienced abuse or trauma, as well as those who have abused others, through psychotherapy, advocacy, campaigning and other support. Respond also aims to prevent abuse by providing training, consultancy and research. They have a helpline 0808 808 0700 on Fridays, 12.30 to 4pm. Their website has lots of easy read information as well.

Find out more on their website.


Enable unlocking sexual abuse cover
Unlocking sexual abuse and learning disabilities


This booklet, produced by Enable Scotland, covers how to help adults with learning disabilities deal with sexual abuse and its consequences. It provides basic information for families and care staff about what to do when they suspect or know that someone has been abused or when someone discloses abuse. It also explains what might happen after abuse is reported and the support and assistance that might be available.


There is a separate accessible booklet for adults with learning disabilities called 'Surviving sexual abuse'. It can be read alongside this booklet.

Download both booklets from the Enable website



Action Against Cruelty

Action Against Cruelty is a website and online network that brings together multi-agency guidance on all aspects of the problem from definitions, detection, prevention and safeguarding to criminal and civil proceedings and aftercare, as well as under-reporting, communication with victims and perpetrators and supportive communities.

Visit the Action Against Cruelty website




Looking into Abuse: Research by People with Learning Disabilities

This three year participatory research project has been a collaborative venture between the University of Glamorgan, Rhondda Cynon People First and New Pathways, and has been funded by the Big Lottery. The idea for the research came from people with learning disabilities and they have been actively involved at all stages of the research process.
The aims of the project were to: develop better ways for people with learning disabilities to find support after being abused and to prevent abuse; develop more detailed information on how participatory research works for all concerned; disseminate research findings to people with learning disabilities and professionals. Easyread and executive summaries also available.

Find out more on the University of South Wales' website




Loneliness and Cruelty report

Loneliness and Cruelty is a groundbreaking study based on in-depth interviews by frontline practitioners across the country. The report shows that people with learning disabilities living independently in the community experience a disturbing range of harassment, abuse and related crime with alarming frequency. The perpetrators in the main are local people, neighbours, often young people and schoolchildren. Incidents happen when people are out and about in the community, but also in and around their homes. Above all, these incidents are straightforward cruelty. The report can be downloaded for free but you will have to register.

Register and download the report






Guidance to support integrated and person-centred care for people with health and social care needs

Think Local Act Personal, commissioned by the Department of Health, the Local Government Association and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and in association with Coalition for Collaborative Care, have launched a major new online tool to support this approach and to aid broader implementation of the Care Act.

The personalised care and support planning tool is aimed at commissioners, planners, clinicians and practitioners across the health and social care system grappling with the complex changes needed to deliver person-centred, coordinated care.

Find out more about the tool 


Toolkits to help adults with learning disabilities navigate services in Wales

A series of new guides aimed at helping adults with a learning disability and their carers access health and social care services has been launched by Mencap Cymru in conjunction with Cardiff University’s School of Law.

The toolkits were developed from a recognition that carers are often overwhelmed by the breadth and complexity of the framework for accessing services. The guides will be used by Mencap Cymru’s Regional Officers, to support their work assisting people with a learning disability and their carers to access the services to which they are legally entitled.

Download the toolkit 


Unlocking sexual abuse and learning disabilities

This booklet, produced by Enable Scotland, covers how to help adults with

learning disabilities deal with sexual abuse and its consequences. It provides basic information for families and care staff about what to do when they suspect or know that someone has been abused or when someone discloses abuse. It also explains what might happen after abuse is reported and the support and assistance that might be available.

There is a separate accessible booklet for adults with learning disabilities called 'Surviving sexual abuse'. It can be read alongside this booklet.

Download both booklets from the Enable website



Action Against Cruelty

Action Against Cruelty is a website and online network that brings together multi-agency guidance on all aspects of the problem from definitions, detection, prevention and safeguarding to criminal and civil proceedings and aftercare, as well as under-reporting, communication with victims and perpetrators and supportive communities.

Visit the Action Against Cruelty website



Looking into Abuse: Research by People with Learning Disabilities

This three year participatory research project has been a collaborative venture between the University of Glamorgan, Rhondda Cynon People First and New Pathways, and has been funded by the Big Lottery. The idea for the research came from people with learning disabilities and they have been actively involved at all stages of the research process.
The aims of the project were to: develop better ways for people with learning disabilities to find support after being abused and to prevent abuse; develop more detailed information on how participatory research works for all concerned; disseminate research findings to people with learning disabilities and professionals. Easyread and executive summaries also available.

Find out more on the University of South Wales' website



Loneliness and Cruelty report

Loneliness and Cruelty is a groundbreaking study based on in-depth interviews by frontline practitioners across the country. The report shows that people with learning disabilities living independently in the community experience a disturbing range of harassment, abuse and related crime with alarming frequency. The perpetrators in the main are local people, neighbours, often young people and schoolchildren. Incidents happen when people are out and about in the community, but also in and around their homes. Above all, these incidents are straightforward cruelty. The report can be downloaded for free but you will have to register.

Register and download the report


Recognising quality in independent advocacy

The QPM works in conjunction with the Advocacy Code of Practice, enabling providers to demonstrate how they are meeting the different standards set out in the code. Since the first edition was launched in 2008 over 80 organisations have been awarded the QPM.


Details of organisations who currently hold the QPM Award and who can display the QPM Award logo can be viewed here: Organisations with the QPM Award

Find out more 





Same Difference cover image
Unlocking sexual abuse and learning disabilities

This booklet, produced by Enable Scotland, covers how to help adults with
learning disabilities deal with sexual abuse and its consequences. It provides basic information for families and care staff about what to do when they suspect or know that someone has been abused or when someone discloses abuse. It also explains what might happen after abuse is reported and the support and assistance that might be available.

There is a separate accessible booklet for adults with learning disabilities called 'Surviving sexual abuse'. It can be read alongside this booklet.

Download both booklets from the Enable website



Action Against Cruelty

Action Against Cruelty is a website and online network that brings together multi-agency guidance on all aspects of the problem from definitions, detection, prevention and safeguarding to criminal and civil proceedings and aftercare, as well as under-reporting, communication with victims and perpetrators and supportive communities.

Visit the Action Against Cruelty website



Looking into Abuse: Research by People with Learning Disabilities

This three year participatory research project has been a collaborative venture between the University of Glamorgan, Rhondda Cynon People First and New Pathways, and has been funded by the Big Lottery. The idea for the research came from people with learning disabilities and they have been actively involved at all stages of the research process.
The aims of the project were to: develop better ways for people with learning disabilities to find support after being abused and to prevent abuse; develop more detailed information on how participatory research works for all concerned; disseminate research findings to people with learning disabilities and professionals. Easyread and executive summaries also available.

Find out more on the University of South Wales' website



Loneliness and Cruelty report

Loneliness and Cruelty is a groundbreaking study based on in-depth interviews by frontline practitioners across the country. The report shows that people with learning disabilities living independently in the community experience a disturbing range of harassment, abuse and related crime with alarming frequency. The perpetrators in the main are local people, neighbours, often young people and schoolchildren. Incidents happen when people are out and about in the community, but also in and around their homes. Above all, these incidents are straightforward cruelty. The report can be downloaded for free but you will have to register.

Register and download the report


Recognising quality in independent advocacy

The QPM works in conjunction with the Advocacy Code of Practice, enabling providers to demonstrate how they are meeting the different standards set out in the code. Since the first edition was launched in 2008 over 80 organisations have been awarded the QPM.


Details of organisations who currently hold the QPM Award and who can display the QPM Award logo can be viewed here: Organisations with the QPM Award

Find out more 





everybody hurts

'Everybody Hurts'

Pembrokeshire People First, a campaigning group run by and for people with learning disabilities, have launched a powerful and moving film where the members defy stereotypes by discussing their hopes and dreams for the future, alongside the soundtrack 'Everybody Hurts'.

Watch the video




Self assessment first: Sharing the stories of self advocates about staying healthy, being safe and living well

The Improving Health and Lives Public Health Observatory, part of Public Health England, have published the findings from the first Joint Health and Social Care Learning Disability Self Assessment Framework announced in Transforming Care Action as Action 38. This report presents the findings of self assessment ratings made by Partnership Board areas against indicators in: staying healthy; being safe; and living well. Some of these stories are the words of people with learning disabilities. Others have been written by carers or advocates about their own experiences, or on behalf of people with learning disabilities. The stories cover a range of experiences, both positive and negative.

Find out more on the IHAL website 




Scottish Ind Advocacy Alliance website image
Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance

Live in Scotland and  looking for an advocate? This website has a 'Find an advocate' page and offers a lot more information and advice about advocacy.

Find out more on their website.



Your guide to advocacy cover

Your Guide to Advocacy

Asist, an advocacy organisation in Staffordshire wrote a book about advocacy to help their clients understand better what they could expect from their advocate.

BILD worked with Asist to make a few changes so that the book could be used by any advocacy group. We think this will save groups having to produce their own individual information. 

They cost £1 each plus postage. If you want to order this book you please email us at enquiries@bild.org.uk




Staying Strong advocacy cover

Staying Strong

'Staying Strong' was produced by the National Forum of people with learning difficulties (2011), and gives a lot of useful information about self advocacy.

Download a copy of 'Staying Strong'.

The National Forum has also produced a follow-up document, 'Staying Strong - for how long'.

Download 'Staying Strong - for how long'.


The BILD Factsheet on advocacy

Advocacy can take a number of forms, but independent advocacy such as citizen advocacy, peer advocacy and self-advocacy should be differentiated from the roles played by family and professional carers.

Download our factsheet about advocacy




SCIE advocacy report cover
Social Care Institute for Excellence papers about advocacy

SCIE Report 24: Personalisation and learning disabilities: A review of evidence on advocacy and its practice for people with learning disabilities and high support needs

Download from the SCIE website.

SCIE Position paper 6: Supporting self-advocacy.

Download from the SCIE website.



Advocacy in social care cover

Advocacy in Social Care

In 2011 the Equalities and Human Rights Commission produced a report, 'Advocacy in Social care for groups protected under equality legislation'.

You can download a copy of the report.






Change advocacy for parents cover
Unlocking sexual abuse and learning disabilities

This booklet, produced by Enable Scotland, covers how to help adults with
learning disabilities deal with sexual abuse and its consequences. It provides basic information for families and care staff about what to do when they suspect or know that someone has been abused or when someone discloses abuse. It also explains what might happen after abuse is reported and the support and assistance that might be available.

There is a separate accessible booklet for adults with learning disabilities called 'Surviving sexual abuse'. It can be read alongside this booklet.

Download both booklets from the Enable website



Action Against Cruelty

Action Against Cruelty is a website and online network that brings together multi-agency guidance on all aspects of the problem from definitions, detection, prevention and safeguarding to criminal and civil proceedings and aftercare, as well as under-reporting, communication with victims and perpetrators and supportive communities.

Visit the Action Against Cruelty website


Looking into Abuse: Research by People with Learning Disabilities

This three year participatory research project has been a collaborative venture between the University of Glamorgan, Rhondda Cynon People First and New Pathways, and has been funded by the Big Lottery. The idea for the research came from people with learning disabilities and they have been actively involved at all stages of the research process.
The aims of the project were to: develop better ways for people with learning disabilities to find support after being abused and to prevent abuse; develop more detailed information on how participatory research works for all concerned; disseminate research findings to people with learning disabilities and professionals. Easyread and executive summaries also available.

Find out more on the University of South Wales' website


Loneliness and Cruelty report

Loneliness and Cruelty is a groundbreaking study based on in-depth interviews by frontline practitioners across the country. The report shows that people with learning disabilities living independently in the community experience a disturbing range of harassment, abuse and related crime with alarming frequency. The perpetrators in the main are local people, neighbours, often young people and schoolchildren. Incidents happen when people are out and about in the community, but also in and around their homes. Above all, these incidents are straightforward cruelty. The report can be downloaded for free but you will have to register.

Register and download the report





Autism in the workplace - Report on current practice

Business Disability Forum (BDF) announced the launch of its latest research report: Square holes for square pegs: Current practice in employment and autism. The report examines current practice in the employment of people with autism amongst BDF’s membership organisations and makes key recommendations for employers when adopting inclusive practice.

The research draws attention to the need for autism awareness in the workplace and the importance of removing barriers for individuals with autism.  

Find out more information

Download the report

Acknowledging autism: Moscow foundation film provides comfort

People with autism and their families often feel like outcasts in Russia: They are not very welcome in public places and going to the theater or cinema can become a big ordeal. However, the first movie theater for children with autism and their families recently started operating in Moscow.  

Find out more information.

Choice and control the autism friendly way

This new BILD book, by Sue Hatton, clearly explains the path that needs to be taken in order to work effectively with individuals with autism. 

Beginning by being autism aware, learning to become autism friendly and on to being able to work in a truly autism intelligent way. It does this in particular by challenging the more common held views on choice and control and shows what really needs to happen for many people with autism is for choice to be limited and restricted and even at times withheld altogether. 

The people with autism who made significant contributions to this book tell us how stressful and anxiety making quite simple everyday choices can be and theirs is the voice that needs to be heard. 

Find out more information and order the book


Patient versions of SIGN guideline on autism spectrum disorders

Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) is now consulting on the following patient versions of the guideline on autism spectrum disorders:

  • Autism: A booklet for adults, partners, friends, family members and carers
  • Autism: a booklet for young people
  • Autism: a booklet for parents and carers

 

The drafts and feedback form can be found on the SIGN website >

The Economist: How not to squander the potential of autistic people

Autism is a condition that defies simple generalisations. Except one: the potential of far too many autistic people is being squandered. Although around half of those with autism are of average intelligence or above, they do far worse than they should at school and at work.

The amount of public money spent studying autism is shockingly modest. Britain’s government spends a trivial £4m ($5.6m) a year. America shells out around $200m a year—about what it costs to look after 100 severely autistic people for a lifetime. Such sums are dwarfed by the opportunity cost of having so many potentially productive people dependent on others. Beautiful or otherwise, an autistic mind is a terrible thing to waste. 

Find out more information

10 rules to ensure 'challenging behaviour', a thought provoking book

'10 Rules for ensuring people with learning disabilities and those with autism develop 'challenging behaviour' is a full colour, pocket-sized booklet that aims to spark thought and discussion on how we can better understand those with autism and/or with learning difficulties and their needs.

Written in the voice of someone with autism, this booklet directly addresses the many practices and assumptions that that cause so many problems for children and adults with autism and learning difficulties and their family, friends and carers.

The ‘ten rules’ concept sets out to be deliberately provocative and is the first in a series that will address the topic of autism and how not to do things. 

Find out more information.

Choosing Autism Interventions: A Research-Based Guide

Choosing Autism Interventions: A Research-Based Guide provides an accessible evidence-based overview of the most commonly used interventions for children and adults with autism. It summarises best clinical practice from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and gives a set of tools to help you evaluate interventions for yourself. It is the first guide of its kind to meet the requirements of the NHS Information Standard. 

Find out more information. 

How to help autistic students succeed at university

Campus life can be particularly challenging for those with autism, but there are simple steps academics can take to reduce anxiety and confusion. 

This include focusing on strengths, being aware of the sensory environment, avoiding ambiguity, planning ahead, managing group work, being accommodating and educating yourself.

Find out more information 


Fim about what it's like to have autism

Starring ten year old Alex (pictured),who has autism, a new film produced by the National Autistic Society aims to portray what it's like have autism. "I hope it makes people aware of autism", said Alex, who finds it difficult to cope in busy environments and can get upset if there are too many people or if it's too noisy. 

Find out more information 

Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory 

The Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory has been set up to provide better information about the health and health care of people with learning disabilities and people with autism in Scotland. The Observatory will generate and translate information into knowledge, that is designed to inform actions, practice and policy to benefit people with learning disabilities and people with autism.  

Find out more information 

Study highlight 'enormous hidden crisis' of early deaths of people with autism

People with autism are dying earlier than the general population, often through epilepsy or suicide, a charity has warned. Citing recent research carried out in Sweden, the charity Autistica
described the problem as an "enormous hidden crisis". The study, in the British Journal of Psychiatry, suggested autistic people die on average 16 years early.  

Download the report >


Holding an event for people with autism? Here's what you need to know

  • Don’t worry about introductions
  • Make sure the event isn’t dominated by one or two people
  • Give everyone an equal chance to contribute
  • Be creative
  • Contact people in advance 

 

Find out more information 

Launch of Virtual Tours for people with autism

Accessing new places can make people with autism feel anxious. Autism West Midlands, local authorities and Google Street View have created virtual tours to help people with autism prepare their journey and familiarise themselves with new locations. The virtual tours are designed to give people with autism an opportunity to familiarise themselves with a venue before they visit it.  

Find out more information

Assessing for autism

In SEN magazine, psychologist Mark Chapman looks at the vital contributions families and school staff make to the autism assessment process. He clarifies the process of autism assessments, signs of autism at home and at school, and how parents and schools can help and supporting during the process. 

Find out more information 

Project enhances support for people with autism and sight loss

The Autism and Sight Loss project, a collaborative project between the Royal National Institute of Blind People, Scottish Autism and Edinburgh Napier University, has shown that educating autism practitioners in vision awareness has increased access to eye care and improved day-to-day support services for people with autism and sight loss. The aim of the project has been to evaluate a training model for better identifying and supporting people with autism and sight loss. 

Find out more

Is a ‘Spectrum’ the Best Way to Talk About Autism?

"Charting where an individual falls on the autism spectrum is nearly impossible. After talking to doctors, epidemiologists, self-advocates, and anthropologists, I learned that the more you try to pin down what the autism spectrum actually looks like, the looser your grasp on it will become", Rose Evelet writes in a blog. 

Find out more.

SEN and Disability in the Early Years Toolkit

The toolkit supports early years providers in implementing the special educational needs and disability reforms. The toolkit is based on the statutory requirements and the guidance from the EYFS, the SEN and the disability frameworks; draws on a range of practice guidance; and includes useful tools and reflective tasks for early years practitioners.

Download the toolkit


How to manage autism in the workplace

Employers increasingly need to assess and address autism issues in the workplace without discrimination says this occupational health article in Personnel Today. This can be achieved by inputting workplace strategies such as the use of specialist employment agencies as well as adjustments and adaptations such as a consistent schedules and positive behaviour support they said.  

Find out more information

The story of parents and activists who fought for autism acceptance

The story of autism is many stories, from doctors, to parents, to people with autism themselves. Journalists Caren Zucker and John Donvan examine that history in their new book, "In a Different Key: The Story of Autism."

Here the authors discuss the evolving definition of the diagnosis and the constant of parental love. "The definition has changed again and again and again over the years. It’s a condition where there’s no DNA test, there’s no cheek swab, biological marker. Autism is defined by looking at behaviors", said John.  

Find out more information 


Anorexia and autism

The invisible link between autism and anorexia

On the surface, autism and anorexia couldn’t seem more different. People with autism are supposedly not attuned to the emotions of others, whereas people with anorexia are commonly thought of as oversensitive young girls hell-bent on fulfilling cultural ideals of thinness. But strip off the misconceptions, and the two conditions are far more similar than anyone believed, says Janet Treasure, a psychiatrist and director of the eating disorders program at Maudsley Hospital, London.  

Find out more information 

Comedian talks about life with his autistic son

In this Radio 4 programme, comedian John Williams finds unexpected joy in his autistic son's view of life, despite the inevitable struggles. "I have learnt far far more about the human condition, and what it truly means to be alive from just being with those with learning diabilities than I have from any eminent teacher or book", said John. 

Listen to the interview

STAR SEN Toolkit

This toolkit is a free online resource that offers practical advice and teaching activities to help secondary schools explore internet safety with young people with autism spectrum disorders. Developed in partnership with Leicester City Council’s Building Schools for the Future Programme, they worked closely with three Leicester schools to develop the resource. The Toolkit is free to download online and the teaching activity ideas are provided in Word so you can edit and adapt them to suit your learners. 

Download the toolkit


From Like to Love for Young People with Asperger's Syndrome (Autism Spectrum Disorder)

This book addresses this issue in practical terms and provides carefully designed activities for parents to work through with their children to help them to understand and express affection. Their child will learn to identify his or her own and others' comfort and enjoyment range for gestures, actions and words of affection and the different ways to express feelings for someone, appropriate to each relationship and situation. The activities are simple, straightforward, and very carefully structured, so that they can be undertaken at the pace that works for the individual family. The book also guides the adult through the challenges faced by the child, leading to greater understanding and confidence in their relationship with their child, and increased ability to nurture the child's ability to form engaged relationships and friendships with others.

Find out more


Aspergers video

Film gives insight into how young people with Asperger's think

The AM3 group consists of young people aged 12-17 who have Asperger’s Syndrome. Teaming up with Fixers, a national charity that supports young people to tackle issues that matter to them, the group came up with the idea of creating two short films. The films give an insight into how young people with Asperger’s think, including how it can feel for them if they encounter difficulties when interacting with people.  

Watch the video here 


National Autistic Society website image

National Austistic Society

A website that is full of information about autism and Asperger Syndrome, as well as guidance, resources and useful links.


Find out more on the NAS website.




The Autism skills and knowledge list has been developed jointly by Skills for Care, Skills for Health and the National Autistic Society to help enhance awareness of autism and improve skills among workers in generic health and social care services. This work is part of a wider range of on-line training resources funded by the Department of Health to increase awareness and understanding of autism across all public services.

Find out more and download the document on the Skills for Care website


scie autism website image

Improving access to social care for adults with autism

This guide, from the Social Care Institute of Excellence (SCIE), looks at how social care services can improve access to adults with autism. It is based on research that explores the barriers to services experienced by people with autism. It covers people with autism, whether or not they also have a learning disability. The guide suggests ways services can improve, identifying how best to meet the goals of the government's autism strategy.

Find our more on the SCIE website


The Autism Act 2009: developing specialist skills in autism practice

A guide, published in Learning Disability Practice in October 2011 and supported by the Department of Health, that  is aimed at people in a specialist role who will lead the planning, development and commissioning of services with local authorities and GP consortia. This guide also discusses the development of skills and knowledge in autism practice.

Download a copy. 


autism education trust transition toolkit cover
Transition toolkit

This toolkit, produced by The Autism Education Trust, is a summary of the common issues surrounding transition for young people on the autism spectrum, as well as a guide to the considerations that should be taken by those supporting them. We offer some practical strategies to support transition periods as well as provide a list of useful links to other organisations and support materials.

Download from The Autism Education Trust website.


Autism: Recognition, Referral, Diagnosis and Management of Adults on the Autism Spectrum. NICE clinical guideline no. 142

Autism is a lifelong condition with particular issues for adults, which are addressed by this NICE guideline. While some people are diagnosed in childhood, a large proportion of adults with autism find obtaining a diagnosis in adult difficult or impossible. Under-recognition of autism in adults can lead to inadequate care, masking of co-existing mental and physical health problems, and to social and economic exclusion. This guideline aims to address these widespread problems and increase the uptake of interventions by adults with autism to enable them to live more independent lives.

The guideline contains all the evidence on which the recommendations were based, including further data on a free CD-ROM which includes: characteristics of included studies; profile tables that summarise both the quality of the evidence and the results of the evidence synthesis; all meta-analytical data, presented as forest plots, and detailed information about how to use and interpret them.

View the NICE clinical guideline online


Autism Online Resource Centre

The Department of Health funded a series of on-line training resources and booklets to increase awareness and understanding of autism across all public services.
Organisations used this funding to produce a range of quality materials to enable frontline staff to better recognise and respond more effectively to the needs of adults with autism.


Find out more about the online resource


First National local authority self-assessment of services for people with Autism 

The Improving Health and Lives: Learning Disability Observatory has published the results of the first national local authority self-assessment exercise for services for people with autism.The aim of the exercise was to establish a baseline position against which to monitor progress in the implementation of the autism strategy, Fulfilling and Rewarding Lives.

Find out more on the IHAL website.


Asperger’s Syndrome Foundation

The Asperger’s Syndrome Foundation (ASF) is a small charity set up to support and educate parents and non-specialist professionals about the condition. It also runs training workshops for adults. The foundation’s website includes information sheets on a number of important topics, include diagnosis, girls with Asperger’s syndrome, bullying, sensory issues, motor clumsiness, anger management and strategies for social behaviour.

Visit the Asperger Syndrome Foundation website


"FindMe" iPad ‘app’ helps autistic children

A game for the iPad has been launched aimed at improving the social skills of children with autism as young as 18 months. FindMe is a simple game that challenges children to find onscreen character in different scenarios. The game is designed to encourage players to focus on other people and their needs, which people with autism can find difficult.

App developers and education and informatics researchers from the University of Edinburgh collaborated on the game, which they hope will help children with autism practice basic socialising skills before entering nursery or primary school.

FindMe is available for download for free from Apple’s App Store



The Autism Directory gets a makeover

The Autism Directory is a registered charity and provides an online website that signposts autism families to all the help and support available on the internet, and from organisations, charities, businesses and people around the UK. The Directory has also launched a website that allows parents, charities, professionals and organisations to share their suggestions as to what has helped them, support groups they know off, any businesses that are autism friendly, events that are coming up and lots more.

Find out more on The Autism Directory website


Ask Ellie on Autism

Ellie Barker is a Good Morning Britain presenter at ITV West Country. In this week's column, Ellie is asked about waits for autism diagnoses by reader Letitia Bright.  

Find out more information





In Control self directed support and BME leaflet cover
Self-directed support and BME communities

Self-directed support is a new system.
It’s about people being in control of
the support they need to live their life
as they choose.

This fact sheet provides information
about how self-directed support can
be introduced to people from Black and
Minority Ethnic (BME) communities.

Download the fact sheet.

There are lots of other fact sheets on the In Control website about selfdirected support.


PAST project event report cover
The PAST Project

The aim of BILD's PAST project  was to find out why people from Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic communities do not access personal budgets, to find examples of excellence in advocacy within these communities and spread the knowledge of good practice through networks and contacts. 

Find out more and download the report on our PAST Project page.



Reaching and Supporting Diverse Communities

Hft have produced a guide to meeting the needs of people with learning disabilities, and family carers, from newly arrived, Black, Asian and other Minority Ethnic (BME) communities.

Hft’s Family Carer Support Service was commissioned by the Valuing People Support Team to develop this resource, to provide a range of information about meeting the needs of families from BME and seldom heard communities.

Find out more and download the guide from the Hft website.



race equality advocacy report cover

Race equality in practice resource pack: Supporting Advocates Working With Cultural Diversity

Produced by North Wales Race Equality Network as part of the British Institute for Learning Disabilities and the Welsh Assembly Government Advocacy Grants Programme.

“A ‘colour-blind’ approach, or assertion that ‘we treat everyone the same’, is often operated within organisations. Such statements may, however, disguise the fact that organisations have either not considered the needs of minority ethnic communities or have chosen to ignore them.

What is needed, instead, is an approach which moves away from the notion of ‘an average citizen’ to an acknowledgement of the diversity of need and required services”

Download resource pack



July 2012: Reaching Out: to people with learning disabilities and their families from BME communities

The Reaching out to families project of the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities set out to find new ways of addressing the inequalities that people with learning disabilities from Black and Minority Ethnic Communities (BME) and their families experience in health and social care. The project paid particular attention to the role of third sector organisations and usedaction learning techniques to identify good practice.

Download the report from the Foundation website.

 


May 2012:
Here to Stay

The Here to Stay project addresses the gap in the knowledge about the health and social care needs of people with learning disabilities from ethnic minority and new migrant communities living in England.

If you work with people with learning disabilities in education, health or social care in the public, private or voluntary sector, we would like to ask you to complete a survey and share your views and experiences.

Take the survey.
More information about the project.  



 

Top of the page



Care and Support Jargon Buster 

The Care and Support Jargon Buster is a plain English guide to the most commonly used social care words and phrases and what they mean. The definitions were developed and tested by a steering group that included people who use services, carers, representatives from local authorities, information providers and key stakeholders from across the social care sector.

Find out more on the think local act personal website.



Communication passport for school

Kate Sanger’s daughter Laura was removed from classes in the past at her school because she couldn't cope with her environment and the he staff had a poor understanding of the reasons for her behaviour. Kate developed the communication passport for her daughter and now everyone supporting her adheres to the behaviour support plan within the passport.

This has made a huge difference. giving her daughter a voice and making life much better for her and the staff supporting her. You can see the template by following the links below. Many schools are adopting it and the Education Office of the Scottish Government has shown interest in promoting it.

Find out more information.

Visit the mycommpass Facebook page. 


Involve Me cover
Involve Me

The Involve Me resource aims to increase the involvement of people with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) in decision making and consultation. The resource is the result of a three year project, supported by the Renton Foundation and run by Mencap and BILD.

People with PMLD and staff took part by learning about and using different approaches to communication: sharing stories, creative communication, peer advocacy and multimedia advocacy.

Find out more about Involve Me on this website and the Mencap website.


Rix Centre Big Tree website image
The Rix Centre's Big Tree

The Big Tree is dedicated to sharing information and ideas about multimedia and what it can do for the learning disability community.

The site is run by the Rix Centre, a  research and development centre and independent charity that is based at the University of East London's Docklands campus.

The Big Tree is designed for people working with and supporting people with intellectual disabilities, including social carers, teachers, web developers, family members and advocates.

Find out more on the Big Tree website.


Oxford Total Communication website image
Oxfordshire Total Communication

Are you a support worker, parent or carer? Do you know or work with someone with a learning disability? This website is just for you!

 

Here you will find a host of information, links, free resources which you can download, and ideas from other people in Oxfordshire who are using Total Communication to communicate effectively with people with a learning disability.

Find out more on their website.



Gloucestershire Total Communication

Gloucestershire Total Communication offers training courses in communication. The process aims to ensure a 'common language' is adopted for all people to help make a consistent and positive difference to everybody's lives.

Find out more on their website.



Clear and Easy: Making information easy to read and understand 

Clear and Easy is a handbook for making written information easy to read and understand for people with a learning disability. The handbook, produced by Learning Disability Wales, is for anyone who is, or should be, producing accessible information for people with a learning disability. Clear and Easy will help you whether you are from a local advocacy group, a public sector organsiation, or a private service provider, such as a bank.

Find out more on their website.


Animation aims to make it easier to understand the NHS framework

NHS Greenwich Clinical Consulting Group, along with Enabled City and NHS England, have produced an animated graphics films to help explain the national framework for NHS Continuing Healthcare. The film is about 30 minutes long, and there are 2 versions.  The 'continuous play' version is the whole film. The 'playlist version' is the same film divided into sections, and you can move between the sections by using the menu control. The film uses pictures, audio and text, and there is no spoken information that is not also shown in text.  

Watch the continuous play version.

Watch the playlist version. 

Find out more on their website. 

Intensive interraction website image
Intensive interaction

Intensive interaction is an approach to teaching the pre-speech fundamentals of communication to children and adults who have severe learning difficulties and/or autism and who are still at an early stage of communication development.

Find out more on the Intensive Interraction website.


Mencap Communication doc cover

Communication and people with the most complex needs: What works and why this is essential

This guide was commissioned by Mencap in partnership with the Department of Health as part of the programme of work set out in Valuing People Now to ensure people with the most complex needs are included. The guide is aimed at commissioners, to support them in commissioning support and services which meet the communication needs of people with the most complex needs, including people with PMLD. However, it will also be useful for family carers, frontline staff and people with a learning disability.

Find out more about this and download a copy of the report or the easy read version, on the Mencap website.


The Office for Disability Issues (ODI)

The Office for Disability Issues (ODI) leads the government’s vision of achieving equality for disabled people. They are a cross-government organisation that works with government departments, disabled people and a wide range of external groups.

Their website gives information about inclusive communications, offering advice and resources.

Find out more on their website.


CHANGE Accessible Info cover

How to make information accessible

There is a guide to making information accessible produced by Change, called 'How to make information accessible - a guide to producing easy read documents'.

You can download a copy from their website

 

 


Making written information easier to understand for people with learning disabilities

Department of Health document published in November 2010 giving guidance for people who commission or produce Easy Read information.

Download a copy from here


hearing from the seldom heard image
Hearing from the Seldom Heard

People with learning disabilities face many barriers in being able to complain about the services they receive. However people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and other complex communication needs are not going to be greatly helped simply by the production of an integrated complaints procedure or an 'accessible' complaints leaflet, however well designed.

The Hearing from the Seldom Heard project aimed to look at how to overcome barriers and create listening cultures within organizations to hear from those who are seldom heard.

Find out more about the project and download the resources on this website.

The Hearing from the Seldom Heard resource, 'Communication tools and approaches' has a long list of links to further, useful, information.



Netbuddy iPad apps webpage image

Netbuddy Apps for the iPad

Netbuddy has an information page about communications applications that you can run on the Apple iPad computer.

Find out more on the Netbuddy website.

 

The five good communication standards

The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists have published ‘Five good communication standards: Reasonable adjustments to communication that individuals with learning disability and/or autism should expect in specialist hospital and residential settings’.

The standards are intended as a practical resource to support families, carers, staff, professionals, providers and commissioners to make a difference to the lives of individuals using specialist residential services.

View the standards



Award winning Social Care Jargon Buster

Think Local Act Personal’s Social Care Jargon Buster lists 52 of the most commonly used words and phrases in social care and what they mean.

The definitions were developed and tested with people who use services, carers and family members and those who work in social care to ensure they were easy to understand.

The Jargon Buster has won an award from the Plain English Campaign for how it describes complicated social care words in plain, simple language.

View the Jargon Buster


Shining a light on Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Report on research undertaken by the University of Sheffield with Barnsley Hospital aimed to provide robust evidence of how many people in the UK could benefit from AAC and to provide for the first time a picture of current AAC service provision in the UK.

Read the report online 


Breaking Bad News website

A website that can be used by practitioners, families and carers to ease the process of breaking bad news to people with intellectual disabilities

Find out more on the Breaking Bad News website


A Safe Community

Disabilinet is a new social networking site developed specifically for disabled people. The community website has been specifically designed to allow people with disabilities to communicate with each other and share experiences in a safe and secure environment. Disabilinet offers specific news, views and topics relevant to less able people.

Find out more on the Disabilinet website





Top of the page




BASE website image
The Knowledge Base at the British Association for Supported Employment

The knowledge base is an open, freely accessible trove of information and resources, both for supported employment and for disability / employment support generally. These resources include practical guidance and support, policy and research reports, evaluations, framework documents and links to relevant content elsewhere on the web.

In addition to contributions from BASE and its member organisations, the knowledge base also acts as an archive for initiatives such as Valuing People Now.

Find out more on the BASE website.


Empowering 'offenders' to move into employment

Step Up is a project empowering people with a learning disability or communication difficulty aged 16-30 who have offended or are at risk of offending to move into employment.

This peer-led project takes learnings from the successful Raising Your Game and Employ Me projects. Step Up engages and prepares this group to move into the workforce through social action initiatives and 1:1 support.

Find out more on the Mencap website.


This is your future

Leonard Cheshire Disability, a charity that helps to support people learning disabilities look for employment, launched 'This is your Future' this week - a career guide specifically designed for students with disabilities. The guide is full of useful information about starting a career and covers looking for work, the recruitment process, being in a job and the different types of support available at each of these stages. 

The guide is available to download here 


Checklist for autism friendly environments

The Checklist for Autism Friendly Environments is an innovative assessment tool designed to support organisations who want to become autism friendly. It helps organisations measure the effectiveness of their environment and asks if they can consider whether there are simple, low cost solutions that can be made to improve the lives of people with autism within their service. The guide was produced by South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust in partnership with Kirklees Council.

The checklist is available to download here 


Valuing People Now employment resources

The Department of Health has developed tools to help Local Authorities support people with learning disabilities into work.

To access the resources visit the Department of health website.


Make the Move website image

Make the Move

Make the Move is a website aimed at young people with learning disabilities in Scotland. The website aims to be a helpful guide for young people at any stage of their careers, from thinking about a job to gaining promotion and progressing further.

www.makethemove.org.uk/


 

Your rights at work

This film was made with a group of people with learning disabilities by the Disability Law Service. It shows what people with learning disabilities can do if they have problems at work. There is also an easy read guide to download as well.

Find out more and see the film 



mi enterprise website image
miEnterprise

miEnterprise is the UK's leading supported self-employment specialist. It is a social enterprise that operates as a mutual marketing co-operative.

"We set miEnterprise up because we know that there are a lot of people with earning disabilities and other disadvantages in the jobs market who would like to work. We also know that not very many people are working, and getting paid!"

Visit the miEnterprise website to find out more.


In Business self employment guide cover
In Business Quick guide to Self-employment

This publication is part of the In Business Easy Business Planning series and gives basic information about what you might need to set up a business or be self employed. A list of organisations who may be able to provide help and advice is also included.

Find out more and downnload the guide on the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities' website. There is also a page about the In Business service.


in control micro enterprises leaflet  image
Micro-enterprises

An information fact sheet from In Control about how self-directed support can help you to set up your own business.

Open the leaflet.

There are lots more fact sheets from In Control available on these pages on their website.

They also have audio versions of their fact sheets available here.



Films about employment from Inclusive Films


It’s Working in Dudley:tells the story of people with learning disabilities making a real success of paid work.

 

Self Employment for People with Learning Disabilities:shows people working for themselves and succeeding with a variety of different business types.

 

Self Employment for People with Mental Health Problems: we meet people who have chosen to work for themselves, find out about their journey, the support they have had and the pros and cons of this approach.

Watch them on the Inclusive Films website


 Disability Employment Strategy Consultation 


The British Association for Supported Employment has published its proposals in response to the Government's review of its disability employment strategy. BASE's recommendations cover commissioning, benefit assessment, contracted delivery, employer engagement, transitions from education, and workforce issues.

Download the proposals from the BASE website

Halving the Gap? A review into the Government's proposed reduction to Employment and Support Allowance and its impact on halving the disability employment gap

A review, 'Halving the gap' was published by three Peers in the House of Lords, Baroness Meacher, Baroness Grey-Thompson and Lord Low, which found “no evidence to suggest that people with disabilities can be incentivised into work by cutting their benefits”.

Download the review 'Halving the Gap' >

Download the easy read version of 'Halving the Gap' >





Evernoor solutions

Evermor Solutions support for access to higher education

Evermor solutions provides comprehensive support for people who want to study at a Higher Education Level, and have a life changing or permanent injury, long term physical or mental health condition or disability.  

Courses are distance learning (online) or campus based and may be studied either part time or full time.

Click here to download an information leaflet in pdf format

Learning Disabilities Core Skills Education and Training Framework 

The learning disabilities core skills education and training framework has been launched.  Developed by Skills for Health, Health Education England (HEE) and Skills for Care, commissioned by the Department of Health, the framework sets out the essential skills and knowledge necessary for all staff involved in learning disability care. The framework will enable organisations to:

  • Identify key skills and knowledge for roles and team
  • Plan and design content for education and training
  • Commission education and training
  • Conduct training needs analysis

 

 Download the framework >

Effects of hearing impairment on children with Down’s syndrome, and what teachers can do to help

Stuart Mills, an Information Officer at the Down's Syndrome Association, writes "Hearing loss is common in children who have Down’s syndrome, due to increased incidence of chronic ear diseases, differences in the structure of the ear and weaker immune systems. 

It is possible that teachers may have a child in their class who has Down’s syndrome with hearing loss that has not been picked up. Possible signs of hearing loss in children with Down’s syndrome are difficulties with balance, poking and rubbing ears frequently, lack of response when their name is called and gets upset by loud noises.

Find out more information.

Confused about the move from a statement to an EHC Plan? 

Special educational needs (SEN) helpline experts, Contact a Family, have seen an increase in calls from parents asking about the move from a statement of special educational needs to the newer Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans in England. 

Although the law came into place in England on 1 September 2014, children with statements of special educational needs will be assessed for an EHC plan at different stages depending on where they live and their age.

Find out more information

All you need to know about the Special Educational Needs reforms

Contact a Family have published a useful overview of the special educational needs reforms (in anticipation of the new school year). This includes information on the Education, Health and Care plan, a local offer and creating a personal budget.  

Find out more information


Helping Children with Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a disability caused by brain damage that restricts normal movement and coordination. Each year, 10,000 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Cerebral Palsy Guide are a national organization that helps families and individuals affected by cerebral palsy. They provide free educational materials, financial options and support to help those across the country affected by cerebral palsy. 

Find out more information

adult placement

Ouseburn farm Adult Placements

Through their informal adult placement courses, Ouseburn farm offers a safe and relaxing environment with many opportunities for people to develop meaningful skills, that support their vocational, health and well-being and recreational needs

Adults with learning disabilities who are supported by personal budgets are able to choose from a selection of farm related courses including, growing, catering and animal projects as well as creative training subjects.

Find out more information 


childcare for families with disabled children

Legal resource will prevent families missing out on early years education

A new resource has been produced to help parents access free childcare for children with disabilities aged between two and four years old. The guide, developed by legal experts Irwin Mitchell, Monckton Chambers and the charities Every Disabled Child Matters and the Family and Childcare Trust, will make it easier for parents to understand their rights around the government's free early education offer. It will also help them challenge decisions made by local authorities and childcare providers that result in their child being denied access to free childcare. 

Find out more information 

The Department of Education answers Top 10 questions on the changes in SEN and disability education

Special Needs Jungle blog asked parents to send questions about their experiences of the new SEND system for The Department of Education (DoE).

These questions were compiled in to 10 themes. The first theme, 'SEN support', asked "There is still confusion about how to access specialist support in mainstream (schools). How can you help them with this?", to which the DoE responded saying, "The new SEN support system takes the form of a four-part cycle known as the graduated approach.  For children with a specific learning difficulty or dyslexia, there should be a cycle of assessment, planning, doing and reviewing."

Find out more information

Excel

Excel Learning program targets learning difficulties

Excel Strategic Learning Centre, pursues the goal of helping both children and adults overcome an array of learning difficulties through programs in neuroplasticity.

The programs can range from something as simple as identifying shapes and colours, to following patterns and instructions. Each training program includes support through the process of regular progress reports, recommendations for schools and teachers, and parental support.  

Find out more information

Lord Blunkett

Children are missing out on play opportunities vital to their development

A new report by Sense reveals the severe restrictions facing children with disabilities in accessing play. The report identifies failings at every level that result in children with disabilities missing out on play opportunities that are vital to their emotional, social and physical  development. A lack of attention by government, insufficient funding at a local level and negative attitudes towards children with disabilities and their families are all barriers highlighted in the report. 

Download the report > 





If you can recommend any information about people with learning disabilities that would be useful to others, please let us know at enquiries@bild.org.uk

 

Top of the page



Membership web banner Vertical 170x737px




 


portrait mailing list v2